Game of Thrones: Breaker of Chains Recap Show
By WiC Staff on in WIC Live.

episode-33-13-1024

Another week, another edition of Winter is Coming Live. There is quite a bit to talk about. This week we discuss all the fallout from the Purple Wedding. We also journey up to The Wall to discuss the impending Wildling invasion and also to Meereen, where Daenerys is about to take down another slave city.

We also welcome a special guest, comedian Dave Cope to our panel. Finally, we take your questions on Sunday’s episode.

All that and more, after the jump.

Winter is Coming Live Game of Thrones Season 4 Episode 3 Recap – April 21 by Winter Is Coming


21 Comments

  1. Valyrian Plastic
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 11:44 am | Permalink

    Hodorius!

  2. WompWomp
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

    Holy crap. Tybee gets it. Jaime’s rape of Cersei came from a place of weakness, and it’s only recently that he’s discovered they’re at odds with each other. He’s never had to force the issue before. It’s still a rape, but it’s not some disembodied twist. It’s derived from the characters and the changes they’ve both experienced.

    It is regrettable that we’ve barely seen Cersei and Jaime in their former state as a couple. I can see how that lack of context would throw non-readers. We haven’t even heard Jaime elaborate on the nature of his relationship to anyone but Catelyn, and even then he didn’t make as firm a point of it. Their relationship could be quite difficult for non-readers to comprehend for lack of the relevant material.

  3. Mrs. D. Ranged in AZ
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 12:51 pm | Permalink

    Only comment I really wanted to make is about Tywin. He IS always a long thinker and is incredibly pragmatic. However, Tybee’s statement that he is always direct and straightforward is not true. Tywin may make direct statements but that doesn’t mean they are always truthful statements nor that his statements are directed at an obvious objective. For instance when he is speaking to Oberyn he says The Mountain was not acting on his orders when he killed and raped Elia and her kids. However, I would bet every thing I own that Tywin either directly ordered their deaths (remember he is incredibly pragmatic and those kids were heirs to the throne and if Elia had been left alive but the kids were killed she would have made trouble) OR Tywin sent The Mountain without specific orders for “plausible deniability” KNOWING that The Mountain would act in such a way as to kill them. The rape wasn’t Twyin’s plan…it serves no purpose except to further inflame Dorne, which he would not have wanted. Think about it…if Tywin wanted them alive and unmolested…The Mountain is the LAST person you’d send. So Tywin did order their deaths or he sent the worst person possible on purpose–either way, Twyin is just as responsible. Oberyn is smart enough to suss this all out but he’ll still take Tywin up on his offer in order to gain more inside knowledge and a better position to exact his revenge.

  4. Salty Dornishman
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 1:29 pm | Permalink

    WompWomp:
    Holy crap. Tybee gets it. Jaime’s rape of Cersei came from a place of weakness, and it’s only recently that he’s discovered they’re at odds with each other. He’s never had to force the issue before. It’s still a rape, but it’s not some disembodied twist. It’s derived from the characters and the changes they’ve both experienced.

    It is regrettable that we’ve barely seen Cersei and Jaime in their former state as a couple. I can see how that lack of context would throw non-readers. We haven’t even heard Jaime elaborate on the nature of his relationship to anyone but Catelyn, and even then he didn’t make as firm a point of it. Their relationship could be quite difficult for non-readers to comprehend for lack of the relevant material.

    This X 1 million!! Non-book readers have never been presented any insight as to the internal dynamics of the Jaime/Cersi relationship. Nor have we book readers, actually… that’s an inhibiting thing about the POV style. We never really know how much is colored by the person’s perception.

    Is it out of character for Jaime to rape his lover? Lots of folks say so, and point to his disgust of Aerys’ raping Rhaella and his defense of Brienne. But does Jaime perceive what he did to Cersi as rape? Does Cersi? While we here in our modern times know that “no means no,” this is not how it goes in Westeros.

    I guess we’ll see next week.

  5. Novuzzlikeyea
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

    Salty Dornishman,

    Ya that was definitely rape and rape affects victims in any setting asshole.

  6. Alfador
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 1:53 pm | Permalink

    How do you make the dumb advertisement stop showing up every few minutes while streaming the video?

  7. Salty Dornishman
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 2:06 pm | Permalink

    Novuzzlikeyea,

    Do not speak to me as if I don’t know what rape is. I’ve been there & do not care to elaborate. I’m not talking about the unlawful compelling of a person through physical force or duress to have sexual intercourse.

    I’m talking about character development, adaptation, and what we don’t know. We don’t know if Jaime has ever raped her before – or how she was “affected.” We just don’t know. And just like Tywin and his alleged hatred of whores, Shae notwithstanding, what some people say and what they do are often not the same. Just because Jaime *appears* to be morally opposed to rape doesn’t mean he won’t engage in it.

    BTW, nice ad hominem attack, douchebag.

  8. Ton
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 2:09 pm | Permalink

    I get that people are complaining about the near-destruction of Jaime’s development into a likable character. But then, this seemed to be case for so many characters that we visited during episode 3.
    -Dontos: turns out to be less galant and selfless than we would have liked him to be
    -Olenna Tyrell: turns out to be less of a likable grandma than we thought she was (zero sympathy for her late husband?)
    -Ygritte: is shown being comfortable with killing innocents all over the place
    -Samwise: is shown to leave Gilly in deplorable and downright dangerous circumstances, just because he cannot stand the jealous glances of his brothers of the Night Watch
    -The Hound: we were just getting to like him but he is once again shown as a selfish brute
    -Tywin: we thought his commitment to the Lannister family was his one redeeming quality, but this episode seems to reveal he is happy to be rid of his grandson and quite possibly his own son
    -Etc.
    For me Episode 3 is all about reminding us of the dark instincts that drive so many characters on this show.

  9. Aaron
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 2:14 pm | Permalink

    Novuzzlikeyea,

    Way to have a productive discussion. Can’t adults have a nuanced discussion about the complexity of human sexuality in different time periods? Do you think that if you close your eyes and plug your ears and tell no one to talk about rape, that all the horrible things that have happened in human history will cease to have occurred? The reality is that in medieval times, men could take their women any time they pleased, and treated it as their right. As abhorrent as that is to us, it was extremely common in those days. Those people weren’t considered rapists, or even abnormal. They would be today certainly (at least in developed nations), but it’s incredibly obnoxious when fans are trying to have a conversation about the societal aspects on sexuality in the period they are portrayed in the show, and you’re obviously not grown up enough to do that without feeling that you need to inject modern politics into that to feel like you’re doing your duty and being the victim-saving hero of the comment section at WIC. It’s a fictional story, and we’re talking about the dynamics of THEIR world, not ours. It’s absolutely possible that neither of them would view it as rape in the context of their world and their feigned time perios, regardless of whether it is obviously rape in ours.

  10. WompWomp
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

    Salty Dornishman,

    While the act fulfills the definition of rape in full, whether either of them perceives it as such is definitely a separate question. Hopefully the next episode covers both of their reactions to it, whether they explicitly discuss it or not.

  11. GeekFurious
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

    Salty Dornishman: This X 1 million!! Non-book readers have never been presented any insight as to the internal dynamics of the Jaime/Cersi relationship.Nor have we book readers, actually… that’s an inhibiting thing about the POV style.We never really know how much is colored by the person’s perception.

    Is it out of character for Jaime to rape his lover?Lots of folks say so, and point to his disgust of Aerys’ raping Rhaella and his defense of Brienne.But does Jaime perceive what he did to Cersi as rape?Does Cersi?While we here in our modern times know that “no means no,” this is not how it goes in Westeros.

    I guess we’ll see next week.

    Brilliant. Critically thought out. Perfectly stated.

  12. Lonmouth
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    Novuzzlikeyea

    What a clown.

  13. Ser Davos Seaworth
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 3:31 pm | Permalink
  14. TOIVA
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 3:47 pm | Permalink

    Pretty much agree with Tybee on Jaime.

    (Maybe we Unsullied understand it better from just the show, at least the way it seems it was meant to be portayed in.)

    And I’m still Ed Skrein loyalist, btw.

  15. Renly's Peach
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 4:30 pm | Permalink

    They spelled Meereen wrong..

  16. Swordpen
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 5:11 pm | Permalink

    Looking at the photo of Cersei mourning Joffrey, I’m still wowed by the amount of detail they put into sets, costumes, props. Looks way better than some movies I’ve seen.

    http://tiny-tran.blogspot.ca/2014/04/crystal-clay-game-of-thrones-part-8.html

  17. Ser Davos Seaworth
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

    Swordpen,

    Talking about costumes, people are finding it rather suspicious that the tyrells have brought with them black mourning clothes to kings landing, almost as though they were expecting (or possibly orchestrated) a murder…

  18. axia777
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 8:39 pm | Permalink

    Ser Davos Seaworth:
    Swordpen,

    Talking about costumes, people are finding it rather suspicious that the tyrells have brought with them black mourning clothes to kings landing, almost as though they were expecting (or possibly orchestrated) a murder…

    Eh, they could have those made in less than 24 hours. The Tyrells totally have the loot to do so.

  19. king Stannis
    Posted April 22, 2014 at 11:35 pm | Permalink

    Ser Davos Seaworth:
    Swordpen,

    Talking about costumes, people are finding it rather suspicious that the tyrells have brought with them black mourning clothes to kings landing, almost as though they were expecting (or possibly orchestrated) a murder…

    Those people are typical conspiracy theorist and Kings Landing do sell clothes btw and incase you didn’t know they also sell jewleries and food.

  20. The Winter Rose
    Posted April 23, 2014 at 8:53 am | Permalink

    Salty Dornishman: This X 1 million!! Non-book readers have never been presented any insight as to the internal dynamics of the Jaime/Cersi relationship.Nor have we book readers, actually… that’s an inhibiting thing about the POV style.We never really know how much is colored by the person’s perception.

    Is it out of character for Jaime to rape his lover?Lots of folks say so, and point to his disgust of Aerys’ raping Rhaella and his defense of Brienne.But does Jaime perceive what he did to Cersi as rape?Does Cersi?While we here in our modern times know that “no means no,” this is not how it goes in Westeros.

    I guess we’ll see next week.

    THANK YOU! My thoughts exactly! The entire drama-filled commentary regarding this past episode had me cringing. It really boggles my mind when fans come in and expect their modern morality to apply to a fantasy world based upon medieval morality.

  21. Brena
    Posted April 23, 2014 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

    Salty Dornishman: Non-book readers have never been presented any insight as to the internal dynamics of the Jaime/Cersi relationship.Nor have we book readers, actually… that’s an inhibiting thing about the POV style.We never really know how much is colored by the person’s perception.

    .. and each reader fills the gaps with their own interpretation. I’m a book reader and I remember thinking that Jaime did rape Cersei in the books, and I don’t think Jaime fully realized it, and if confronted would deny it.

    I think the main reason for the uproar is that most book-readers are sympathetic to Jaime because of his POV, while tv-viewers are sympathetic because Nikolaj Coster-Waldau is so damn likable.


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